Without a Country

Without a Country

From the international bestselling author of Last Train to Istanbul comes a novel based on true events that explores the depths of pride, devotion, and persistence as four generations of a family struggle to forge their destinies.

As Hitler’s reign of terror begins to loom large over Germany, Gerhard and Elsa Schliemann—like other German Jews—must flee with their children in search of sanctuary. But life elsewhere in Europe offers few opportunities for medical professor Gerhard and his fellow scientists. Then they discover an unexpected haven in Turkey, where universities and hospitals welcome them as valuable assets.

But despite embracing their adopted land, personal and political troubles persist. Military coups bring unrest and uncertainty to the country, intermarriage challenges the cultural identity of Gerhard and Elsa’s descendants, and anti-Semitism once again threatens their future in the place they call home.

From World War II to the age of social media, one family’s generations find their way through love and loss, sacrifice and salvation, tragedy and triumph—with knowledge hard won and passion heartfelt.

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A Man Without a Country

A Man Without a Country

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “For all those who have lived with Vonnegut in their imaginations . . . this is what he is like in person.”USA Today

In a volume that is penetrating, introspective, incisive, and laugh-out-loud funny, one of the great men of letters of this age–or any age–holds forth on life, art, sex, politics, and the state of America’s soul. From his coming of age in America, to his formative war experiences, to his life as an artist, this is Vonnegut doing what he does best: Being himself. Whimsically illustrated by the author, A Man Without a Country is intimate, tender, and brimming with the scope of Kurt Vonnegut’s passions.

Praise for A Man Without a Country

“[This] may be as close as Vonnegut ever comes to a memoir.”Los Angeles Times

“Like [that of] his literary ancestor Mark Twain, [Kurt Vonnegut’s] crankiness is good-humored and sharp-witted. . . . [Reading A Man Without a Country is] like sitting down on the couch for a long chat with an old friend.”–The New York Times Book Review

“Filled with [Vonnegut’s] usual contradictory mix of joy and sorrow, hope and despair, humor and gravity.”Chicago Tribune

“Fans will linger on every word . . . as once again [Vonnegut] captures the complexity of the human condition with stunning calligraphic simplicity.”The Australian

“Thank God, Kurt Vonnegut has broken his promise that he will never write another book. In this wondrous assemblage of mini-memoirs, we discover his family’s legacy and his obstinate, unfashionable humanism.”–Studs Terkel

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The Man Without a Country And Its History

The Man Without a Country And Its History

A "fascinating introduction...." -Martin Griffin, NY Times Opinionator
In Hales' 1897 edition of "The Man Without a Country" he includes a fascinating introduction in which he explains the details of his original ideas for writing the bestseller and the story of its initial publication in The Atlantic.


In beginning his introduction Hale writes:

"The publisher of this edition of THE MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY asks me to give some account of the circumstances and incidents of its Publication. I do this with a certain reluctance, lest it should seem that I think they are more important than they are. It is true, however, that a series of curious coincidences accompanied the history of the story. Persons who are interested in the Curiosities of Literature, then, may read this preface."

Included in his introduction are references to the "real Philip Nolan" a Texas freebooter and Aaron Burr's Mississippi River intrigues and treason trial. The real Philip Nolan (1771 – 1801) was a horse-trader and freebooter in Natchez, on the Mississippi River, and the Spanish province of Tejas (aka Texas) who had contact with Zebulon Pike on his famous expedition into Spanish Territory.

"The Man Without a Country" is a short story by American writer Edward Everett Hale, first published in The Atlantic in December 1863. It is the story of American Army lieutenant Philip Nolan, who renounces his country during a trial for treason and is consequently sentenced to spend the rest of his days at sea without so much as a word of news about the United States. Though the story is set in the early 19th century, it is an allegory about the upheaval of the American Civil War and was meant to promote the Union cause.

Edward Everett Hale (1822 – 1909) was an American author, historian, and Unitarian minister. Hale first came to notice as a writer in 1859, when he contributed the short story "My Double and How He Undid Me" to the Atlantic Monthly. He soon published other stories in the same periodical. His best known work was "The Man Without a Country", published in the Atlantic in 1863 and intended to strengthen support for the Union cause in the North. As in some of his other non-romantic tales, he employed a minute realism which led his readers to suppose the narrative a record of fact. These two stories and such others as "The Rag-Man and the Rag-Woman" and "The Skeleton in the Closet", gave him a prominent position among short-story writers of 19th century America. His short story "The Brick Moon", serialized in the Atlantic Monthly, is the first known fictional description of an artificial satellite. It was possibly an influence on the novel The Begum's Fortune by Jules Verne. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1865.

Other works by Hale include:

Illustrious Americans (1896)
The Life of Christopher Columbus (1891)
Boy's heroes (1885).

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Without a Country: The Untold Story of America's Deported Veterans

Without a Country: The Untold Story of America's Deported Veterans

Many Americans believe service in the military to be a quintessential way to demonstrate patriotism. We expect those who serve to be treated with respect and dignity. However, as in so many aspects of our politics, the reality and our ideals diverge widely in our treatment of veterans. There is perhaps no starker example of this than the continued practice of deporting men and women who have served.

J. Malcolm Garcia has travelled across the country and abroad to interview veterans who have been deported, as well as the families and friends they have left behind, giving the full scope of the tragedy to be found in this all too common practice. Without a Country analyzes the political climate that has led us here and takes a hard look at the toll deportation has taken on American vets and their communities.

Deported veterans share in and reflect the diversity of America itself. The numerous compounding injustices meted out to them reflect many of the still unresolved contradictions of our nation and its ideals. But this story, in all its grit and complexity, really boils down to an old, simple question: Who is a real American?

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The Man Without a Country, and Other Tales

The Man Without a Country, and Other Tales

It is the story of American Army lieutenant Philip Nolan, who renounces his country during a trial for treason and is consequently sentenced to spend the rest of his days at sea without so much as a word of news about the United States. Though the story is set in the early 19th century, it is an allegory about the upheaval of the American Civil War and was meant to promote the Union cause.

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Woman Without a Country

Woman Without a Country

The reader takes a death-defying journey with a woman whose life is torn apart by two wars, assassinations, and loss of home, family, country, and identity. She is welcomed to safety in another land, but at a high price—years of torturous sexual abuse and suicidal depression, and loss of faith in God and in her adopted home. Just as she gives up, a miraculous cure intervenes—she recovers her identity, the truth of her origins. Transformed, she lives as an enlightened being, but without a home.
This unprecedented pilgrimage—a search for healing and identity—recounted in this book can be considered a search for truth. Why? Because knowing one’s True Self is the ultimate healer. The Buddha stated this principle as dhamma, a law of nature. Living in truth is living with full awareness of the miracle of life—all life. This is it.
Mira’s journey out of the madness of destruction and serious mental illness demonstrates how  creativity, Yoga, meditation devoted to self-inquiry lead to self-knowledge, strengthen intuition, bring one to eternal essence or universal intelligence.  Specifically, combined with breathwork, intentional meditation can provide self-healing, manifestation, pain elimination, and guide to self-realization.

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Philip Nolan: The Man Without a Country

Philip Nolan: The Man Without a Country

Philip Nolan is Chuck Pfarrer’s captivating adaptation of “The Man Without a Country,” the short story originally published in The Atlantic in 1863. Masterfully blending history and fiction, Pfarrer transforms an allegory promoting the Union cause into the story of a young artillery officer, Phillip Nolan, who becomes embroiled in Aaron Burr’s 1807 conspiracy to invade the territories acquired in the Louisiana Purchase. Insinuating that his plot has official approval, Burr convinces Nolan to carry a coded message into the Orleans Territory. Nolan has no idea that the former vice-president intends to set himself up as a dictator—and Burr has no idea that his scheme has been discovered. Soon both Burr and Nolan are in military custody, and Nolan is an accessory to treason.

The nation holds its breath as Burr is put on trial for attempting to dismember the union. The charges against Burr seem ironclad, but his lawyers are clever, and Burr is acquitted. An embarrassed prosecution looks for a scapegoat, and they expand the charges against Nolan to include desertion and treason. Learning that his own court martial will proceed, even though Burr has walked free, Nolan denounces his accusers, damns his country, and tells the court he wishes never again to hear the words “United States” as long as he lives. Nolan’s fateful words stun the court. The judges return with an ominous verdict: the prisoner’s wish will be granted. Nolan is exiled, sentenced to life aboard a series of U.S. warships, never to hear news from or be allowed to speak of his country again.

After years of being shuttled from ship to America’s first secret prisoner ship realizes he is a stateless person, estranged from his keepers and forgotten by his country. Decades after his trial, Nolan is passed aboard an American frigate in the Mediterranean. There, he comes into the custody of a newly commissioned lieutenant, Frank Curran. When Barbary pirates capture an American whaleship, the pair finds themselves drawn into a complex web of international deceit and mortal danger. As a desperate rescue mission is launched, Nolan teaches the young officer a poignant lesson about duty, loyalty and the meaning of patriotism.

Philip Nolan is equal parts adventure, naval history and morality tale. Brilliantly evoking the age of sail, Pfarrer brings alive convincing details of that courageous and sometimes brutal world. More than broadsides and small boat actions, Philip Nolan is a clear-eyed examination of the human condition. Philip Nolan is beautifully crafted, and it deserves a place among the classics of the genre.

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